Tuesday, April 23

David Aylor Wikipedia, Age, Net Worth, Girlfriend, Parent, Law, Children & Many More

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David Aylor Wikipedia, Age, Net Worth, Girlfriend, Parent, Law, Children & Many More; The coroner’s office for Charleston County estimated that it would take at least two months to identify the cause of eminent lawyer David Aylor’s unexpected death and make its findings public.

According to a police incident report, Aylor, 41, was discovered deceased in his Charleston, South Carolina, home on Lowndes Pointe Drive on the afternoon of January 2.

The paper, which has been substantially redacted, claims that Charleston police arrived around 12:15 p.m. According to the complaint, a first responder who was already on the site tried to discover Aylor’s pulse but was unsuccessful.

He was pronounced dead by paramedics around 12:30 pm. Bobbi Jo O’Neal, the coroner for Charleston County, was sent to the site.

Chief Deputy Coroner Brittney Martin informed The Post and Courier that it will take eight to ten weeks for their agency to provide the report, which includes the autopsy and any toxicology findings.

According to the police incident report, Aylor passed away on or around January 1. Ages 43, 45, and 46 are listed for the other three men who are said to be in the house.

Records from the state show that Aylor joined the S.C. Bar in 2006. The next year, he founded his own name-brand personal injury law firm.

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Aylor had previous expertise in both civil and criminal litigation. He briefly worked as an assistant solicitor in the 9th Circuit Solicitor’s Office for Charleston County while also serving as acting prosecutor for the city of Hanahan.

His distinguished career in the Charleston region lasted almost two decades and included a number of notable trials.

2010 saw Aylor defend Ethan Mack, who was charged with killing his ex-friend by beating. After 14 hours of deliberations, a Charleston County jury was unable to find Mack guilty of the murder charge, leading to a mistrial.

The case attracted widespread media interest and was covered in an NBC network “Dateline” crime segment. In 2011, after entering a guilty plea, Mack was given a 25-year prison term.

Aylor’s reputation was enhanced by his involvement in other notable cases. He defended a Charleston resident who was charged with breaking the federal Controlled Substances Act in connection with the first-ever seizure of digital bitcoins by law enforcement.

Aylor briefly defended Michael Slager in 2016, the former North Charleston police officer who was charged with murdering Walter Scott. Slager, a White man, was found guilty of killing the Black driver.

Aylor was given Slager’s case by the Southern States Police Benevolent Association, which Slager had been paying for legal counsel. However, after seeing Slager discharging his gun on camera as Scott tried to flee, Aylor dropped his client. Additionally, the association stopped supporting Slager’s defense.

His law firm recalled Aylor, who had one son, for his “kind and helping spirit.” According to managing attorney Lindsay Johnson, the lawyer treated his coworkers like family.

David left behind a legacy of tenacity, perseverance, and commitment to the community, according to Johnson.

She went on to say that Aylor departed the company with a “solid” succession plan and a staff of 22 individuals who will go on servicing their clients.

According to spokesman Mike Robertson on Jan. 3, the attorney also worked as an adjunct professor at the College of Charleston, where he graduated from. This spring, Aylor was supposed to return to instructing a criminal justice course.

Additionally involved in the community was his law office, David Aylor Law Offices. According to social media, Aylor and his colleagues have collaborated with organizations like the Birthdays for All and the Charleston Hispanic Association.

From Charleston, Ali Rockett contributed to this article.

Editor’s Note: The moment when police officers first showed up at David Aylor’s house was given incorrectly in an earlier version of this article.

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